Why Everyone In Your Organization Should be in Sales

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That’s right, I said it. EVERYONE in your company should be a sales person.

Many times people who are not inherently born to sell have a stigma associated with sales. They fear the inconsistent commission-based paycheck or resent the pressure of trying to meet a quota. 

But when you think about, everyone’s paycheck is really a commission check. If sales isn’t meeting their quotas or you are not getting enough orders over the phone or on your website, then it won’t take long before your company is belly-up.

I am convinced that no matter my role in an organization I have to be a sales person. Does this mean that everyone is paid on commission?  Does this mean I have to meet a quota?  The simple answer is no. 

Sales is really about solving customer issues. It’s about meeting a need that a client has and wowing a customer by exceeding those needs whenever possible.

For example, in the promotional products world, Staples Promotional Products as a whole helps customers create more brand impressions by building awareness to their company or organization.  We help build strong brands by using promotional merchandise that delivers one of the highest ROIs of any advertising medium.

Now, if you’re in IT, Accounting, Procurement or Manufacturing, how can you be a great sales person?

Again, it’s always about serving your customer. In IT, you want to make sure your customer websites are working efficiently so that customers can purchase easily. In Accounting, you ensure customer payments and invoices are handled quickly and accurately. In Procurement, you are negotiating the best deal with suppliers and then passing on those savings to the customer. Manufacturing folks ensure that they work hard to get those products to customers on time. 

So you can see, each department within an organization is extremely essential in “selling” the company at any given time. Therefore, you can always relate your job to serving your customers. 

What else can a non-sales sales person do?

This is where a new way of thinking-as-a-salesperson comes into effect and that’s on your off time. Yes, I know you may not be getting paid for working after hours, but “selling” your company even on your time is a good thing to do. 

In everyday life, we all have an opportunity to make a sale every day. 

  1. Always be professional with people outside of work, even acquaintances and strangers could be a potential customer. Know that everyone you come into contact with from friends, family members, church members and teachers are possible customers.  
  2. Don’t be afraid to refer somebody. If they trust you and you are seen as a professional person, they will trust your company.
  3. If you hear someone talking about a problem that maybe your company can solve, speak up!  You might not be able to sell the product right there, but you can point the prospect to the website, phone number or a salesperson.
  4. Ask your marketing team or sales team if you can hand out your business card with a coupon code.

Everyone has their own level of comfort, but if you don’t speak up, you might be losing a potential client and hurting your company in the end.

You’ll hear 9 “NO”s for everyone 1 “YES”, but when you hear that first “YES” you will become addicted and you will continue to sell. 

Good luck and happy selling!

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Dan Lynde's picture
Dan Lynde

As Staples Promotional Products’ Online Marketing Dude, Dan Lynde practices customer telekinesis, x-ray SEO, laser marketing vision and superhuman e-mail skills to drive traffic and revenue to StaplesPromotionalProducts.com. His favorite promotional products are the Collapsible Koozie® Can Kooler and Collapsible Party Cooler.  


Comments

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Great post Dan! You have some great insight and advice.

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Thank you Ashley.

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Outstanding posting, Dan, and spot-on!

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Thank you for comment Jim. I really appreciate that coming from a sales professional like yourself. 

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Great post, Dan! It definitely makes me think a bit more about my position here at SPP as well as side gigs.

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Thank you for the feedback. One of my goals with this post was to get people thinking of ways they could help their company. I am glad you found it helpful. 

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Nicely written article and although we've all seemingly been told that everyone in the organization is in sales, we oftentimes forget.  

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Right on Chris. I sincerely hope this serves as a reminder to everyone that exact point. Thank you for your comment.

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Great insight, Dan!  I hope all who read your post take this to heart.  Every position is important!

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Thank you Amy. Apprecaite you reading and also appreciating how everyone's role in the company is essential to driving sales growth.  Happy selling!

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Excellent post Dan, very insightful!

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Thanks for reading Alexis.

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Good information Dan.  We all need to be cognoscente of our interactions as well as any opportunity to impact a current or potential client.

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Thanks Deb, that is so true. It is everyone's job to make sure we are exceeding our customers' expectations at all times in all interactions.

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Well said, Dan...This should be part of basic training for every new SPP associate and reinforced throughout the organization, periodically.  TJS

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Ted, that's a great idea! Hopefully this article is the first step.

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Great Article Dan!

 

Thank you so much for sharing,

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Hi Lezlee, good to hear from you.  Thanks for the kind words.

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Great article, and so true.

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Thanks for reading and commenting Steve.

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Very good read Dan.  I had a VP once say "nothing happens until something gets sold".  So true. Also worked with a very spirited CEO for many years who would remind every person in our weekly manager meetings that each of us are in sales.  Regardless of title, division or role, we are all sales people for the company.

Great reminder, thanks for sharing.

Jeremie 

Jeremie Vaught

Director of Sales

Steelhouse

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Jeremie, very wise words, thank you for sharing.

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Very well put Dan!  Great insight.

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Thanks Kristi, glad you agree.

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Dan - Very well said.  I like how you put it in perstective for everyone to relate to; just like Traffic and Logistics is a sales person - we help determine if shipments should ship parcel, LTL or TL in order to effectivaly meet our client's needs.  Thank you for your insight.

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Ah yes, parcel freight, less-than-truckload and truckload. I remember those acronyms and phrases in a previous life. They are just as important to a customer from a cost/time perspective as well. Great example!

Thanks for doing your part Charisee in being a great sales person and customer advocate/ambassador in T&L.

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